Health Policy

Rigorous investigation of the effects of policy decisions and economic factors on the health care system and individual health outcomes

Health and health care in Illinois

Authors

  • Lorens Hälmchen

Chapter 3 of The Illinois Report 2008

This report provides an overview of health policy in Illinois entering 2008.


Download

(.PDF 435.59 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

Options for health care policy

Authors

Health care spending dominates the overall state budget in Illinois, with Medicaid dominating Illinois’ health care budget. The state already made substantial cuts to optional services in Medicaid in 2012. The state is looking towards aggressively pushing “care coordination” to the Medicaid program in the near term, but skepticism about the potential for cost savings is warranted. The scientific literature regarding the effects of disease management, care coordination, and Medicaid managed care generally does not suggest there are huge savings likely from these approaches.


Download

(.PDF 395.34 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

Racial and ethnic health disparities in Illinois

Authors

  • Lorens Helmchen

Illinois has a diverse population: 66 percent of its residents are non-Hispanic white; 15 percent, black; 14 percent Hispanic or Latino origin; and 4 percent Asian. Unfortunately, this demographic diversity is strongly associated with diversity in health status. Blacks and Hispanics are in worse health than whites. Immigrants arrive in Illinois healthy but their health declines rapidly with time spent here.


Download

(.PDF 108.03 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

Medical malpractice liability reform in Illinois

Authors

  • Lorens Helmchen

More than two years after medical malpractice liability reform first took effect in Illinois, its uncertain fate continues to preoccupy policy makers, the public, and, most of all, the interest groups that have been lobbying for or against the measure. On August 25, 2005, Gov. Rod Blagojevich signed into law Senate Bill 475, the principal provision of which limits the amounts that juries can award for pain and suffering.1 The law was primarily intended to curb the growth of medical malpractice insurance premiums.


Download

(.PDF 662.43 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

State health insurance regulations

Authors

At various times advocates, politicians, policy analysts, and concerned citizens have recommended reforms of state small-group and non-group (individual) health insurance markets. The early- to mid-1990s was a period in which health care issues rose to the top of federal and state agendas, and we appear to be entering another such period of acute interest in expanding health insurance coverage.


Download

(.PDF 158.38 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

Health reform

Authors

  • Nicole Kazee

Probably the most dramatic immediate reaction to federal health care reform has been legal: in the first month following President Obama’s signing ceremony, 20 states announced that they will join a lawsuit challenging the federal legislation as unconstitutional. In short, opponents allege that the reforms constitute an illegal federal encroachment on policymaking territory reserved for state governments. In fact, such encroachment is not new. Through rules, incentives, and financing, federal policy routinely guides state decisions.


Download

(.PDF 750.99 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:

Related News

Understanding the effects of Medicare prescription drug insurance

Authors

The Medicare Modernization Act became law in 2003, creating a prescription drug benefit for the elderly called Medicare Part D. At the time of its passage, approximately one-third of seniors did not have prescription drug coverage, leaving them prone to financial and medical hardships. About half of those without prescription drug insurance incurred out-of-pocket spending of $1,200 or more per year. Uninsured patients were also more likely to forego buying essential medications.  


Download

(.PDF 380.33 KB)

Research Area: none

Policy Initiative: none

Share:



Expertise:

none

Julian Reif’s primary area of interest is health care economics, with a current research focus on the value of health and the effectiveness of social insurance programs. One of his recent papers argues that the societal value of medical technology is significantly larger than has previously been recognized, especially with respect to medical treatments for severe diseases. The paper also shows that medical treatments act as a form of insurance. Consequently, medical innovation policy can have a large impact on reducing health risks. Another recent paper finds that Medicare Part D, a prescription drug program for the elderly established by the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003, successfully reduced mortality following its implementation. He also studies energy and environmental policy, such as the gasoline tax, air pollution, and carbon emissions. His recent work in that area includes estimating the effect of air pollution on mortality, medical utilization, and healthcare costs. He finds that the reduction in air pollution over the past twenty years reduced elderly mortality, generating significant social benefits.



Expertise:

none

Darren Lubotsky’s research falls within two broad areas: the American labor market and the health and cognitive development of children. Some of his recent projects study the impact of rising health insurance premiums on public-sector compensation, the impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on employment, and the economic status of immigrants in the United States.



Expertise:

none

Anthony T. Lo Sasso is an economist whose research spans several dimensions of health economics and health services research. Lo Sasso is keenly interested in how government policies affect private sector decisions. Lo Sasso has studied the impact of the State Children’s Health Insurance Program on uninsurance among children and the extent to which public coverage “crowded out” private coverage. In addition, he has examined how community rating provisions affected individual health insurance coverage and uninsurance. Lo Sasso also studies the effects of health savings accounts and other high-deductible health insurance products on service use and spending.